Patterns and Tactics of E-mail Fraud Scams

E-mail scams typically are the result of poorly-planned scenarios in which internet users from around the world attempt to convince other users to give up their personal information.

The rapid-transfer financial technology of the internet allows sites like PayPal to send and receive money with ease. As the total number of internet connections continue to explode upward, the number of dishonest people with internet connections attempting to fleece money off of those who have it is also increasing rapidly.

E-mail scams usually follow a similar pattern. One way or another, these e-mails describe a way for you to receive a great deal of money very rapidly if you contact them with your financial information. There are often a number of gaps in these e-mails, as if they were mass-constructed and thought was not given to their specific implementation. Also, the English used in them is generally a bit quirky (as if it was composed by someone who learned the language from a book, but didn't speak it with regularity).

Recently, I received another scam/fraud e-mail. As a variation, this one did not trip Google's scam alert, because the user created an account with a name to make it seem more legitimate. The text is below.

********************

fromJames Patton <jamespatton000ju@hotmail.co.uk>

reply-tojamespatton00000@rediffmail.com

tojamespatton00000@rediffmail.com

dateSun, Aug 8, 2010 at 6:04 AM

subject2ND NOTICE AGAIN

hide details 6:04 AM (6 hours ago)

Greetings,

We wish to notify you again that you were listed as a Heir to the total sum of (Three Million Six Hundred Thousand British Pounds) in the codicil and last testament of our deceased client. Name now withheld since this is our second letter to you.

We are reaching you the second time because her instruction stipulates that this fund should be paid directly to you upon her death.

If you receive this notice, we request you to kindly acknowledge officially to enable us file in all necessary legal documents to the paying bank for the urgent release of your inheritance.

Please call urgently or send an acknowledgement email to enable us process your inheritance.

Yours Truly,

James Patton

********************

If you receive an e-mail like this, it is best just to junk it and get rid of it. If you do pull it up to have a laugh with your friends, these typically aren't the e-mails that have links to viruses or malicious code, but don't increase your risks of picking something up by clicking links if any exist. Whatever the case, you should definitely NOT do the obvious wrong and try to capitalize on the money, because no money exists and the scam artist is merely trying to steal your personal information and get money from you.

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